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Psychology and Handwriting Analysis: Margins
A blank piece of paper represents life itself, and what you do on that blank paper represents how you interact with other people and with life around you. 
Figure 1: Because we write from left to right as we move across the page, the left represents the past, while the right represents the future. 
Figure 2: The ideal adult margins, based on graphology, would be to have the left margin a little wider than the right margin. This would be a healthy left/right balance, meaning you have a healthy relation to the past & future. 
Margins:
A. Margins Even All Around: Someone who is controlling his/her right margin must write more slowly. There’s no way to write quickly and make every word end in the same place. Therefore, people who keep their margins even all around are most interested in the visual effect. They actually see the paper as almost like a work of art. They are extremely appearance-conscious and interested in beauty, design, symmetry, order, and balance. Everything has to be aesthetically pleasing to these people. To make that happen is to be very detailed-minded, and, of course, to give up spontaneity in the process. Such people plan everything ahead to a great degree.
B. Overly Wide Left Margin: Since the left represents the past, the person who has a very wide left margin is subconsciously putting up an imaginary barrier between himself and the past. This trait is almost always an indication of someone who’s had a terrible past from which he is eager to flee.
C. Overly Wide Right Margin: If you stop yourself short of the right margin, it means you are putting up imaginary barriers as to how you can get in life. When you are moving to the right, you’re moving towards your goals and the future. When you stop too soon at the end of your lines, somewhere in your subconscious is a little voice saying, “Uh-oh. I have to stop. I have to return to the left, to the past and the familiar. This is as far as I can go.” You’re putting up a stop sign. (I’ve seen a few foreign exchange students with margins like these - missing their family overseas.)
D. Margins Too Wide All Around: Writing with margins that are too wide all around is abnormal. It looks more like a column or a poem. If you ask someone to give you a page of his ordinary writing, the person should not put the writing smack dab in the middle. This sort of person needs to be protected by four solid walls. He cannot make it on his own. He doesn’t relate to his environment in a normal manner or fit into society in an average way. 
E. Left Margin Widening as It Descends: This is rapid and spontaneous writing. If you’re writing quickly and spontaneously, you will leave wider and wider left margins as you descend (down) the page. In your haste to make a point and/or reach a goal, it becomes increasingly difficult to take the time to move all the way to the left side of the paper as you come to the next lines. 
F. Left Margin Narrowing as It Descends: This is a tendency to start out brave, going towards the future, but eventually retreating to the past and what is familiar. As this writer proceeds, he becomes more fearful and apprehensive about the future (as the left represents the past).
G. Narrow Margins on Left & Right Side: Some people write all the way to the side on both the left and right, leaving no side margin whatsoever. This trait indicates one who leaves no room for other people. Such a person doesn’t see things from other people’s point of view. Many times in the workplace there’s an employee who’s always having trouble with the other employees. That person often has this type of margin. He takes up all the space and doesn’t see himself properly in relation to his environment, leaving no room for the rights and opinions of others. 
H. Uneven Left Margin: If you’re like 99.999 percent of all literate people who write from left to right, you will automatically have made a straight left margin when writing to someone. It is the only graphological trait we all do in common. The left margin represents “the line of society." Thus, each time we return to the left, it’s up to us whether we’re going to align the next word, or we’re going to get "out of line." That small percentage who do not have a straight left margin are those people who cannot conform to society’s standards. These are also people who, quite expectedly, would not do well in a strict nine-to-five job; they cannot discipline themselves. 
I. No Margins at All: By “no margins at all,” it means someone who writes this way page after page. Obviously, this trait does not apply if someone wrote this way because he/she only had one piece of paper - that is only a matter of practicality, such as for taking notes. With no margins, filling every inch of the paper, indicates someone who feels he must fill every waking moment of his life with an activity. It means compulsively busy, leaving no stone unturned. Very such people have miserly natures as well. This person also leaves no room for the rights or opinions of others.
J. Wide Upper Margin: Graphologists can tell how formal or how informal you feel toward the person you’re writing to by how low or high on the paper you begin the letter. The lower you start, the more you tend to have formal, respectful feelings toward the person to whom you’re writing, such as a letters/papers to teachers, businesses…etc. You waste more paper to show respect, and you “lower” down on the paper. 
K. Narrow Upper Margin: In contrast, a narrow upper margin means you are feeling more familiar than formal toward the person to whom you are writing. By starting high on the paper, you don’t “bow down” or “lower yourself” to show respect.
L. Narrow Lower Margin: This is meant to represent writing until there was no room left - until the writing is crushed. This means someone who delays the inevitable. Such a person is so eager to express himself that he feels it would take too much time to turn the paper over or get another sheet. 
M. Crushed Right Margin: This is dangerous impulsiveness. People like this bash their heads into the wall and do it again and again - (They don’t learn from their mistakes.) They don’t have the sense to say it to themselves, “Hey, wait a minute. You know, the paper ends, and I have to accommodate.” They don’t say it because they don’t care or think about it. Right margin crashers are often people  who have accidents, perhaps driving off cliffs, someone who is accident prone, who doesn’t plan ahead.
Source: Andrea McNicole, Professor at the University of California

Psychology and Handwriting Analysis: Margins

A blank piece of paper represents life itself, and what you do on that blank paper represents how you interact with other people and with life around you. 

Figure 1: Because we write from left to right as we move across the page, the left represents the past, while the right represents the future. 

Figure 2: The ideal adult margins, based on graphology, would be to have the left margin a little wider than the right margin. This would be a healthy left/right balance, meaning you have a healthy relation to the past & future. 

Margins:

  • A. Margins Even All Around: Someone who is controlling his/her right margin must write more slowly. There’s no way to write quickly and make every word end in the same place. Therefore, people who keep their margins even all around are most interested in the visual effect. They actually see the paper as almost like a work of art. They are extremely appearance-conscious and interested in beauty, design, symmetry, order, and balance. Everything has to be aesthetically pleasing to these people. To make that happen is to be very detailed-minded, and, of course, to give up spontaneity in the process. Such people plan everything ahead to a great degree.
  • B. Overly Wide Left Margin: Since the left represents the past, the person who has a very wide left margin is subconsciously putting up an imaginary barrier between himself and the past. This trait is almost always an indication of someone who’s had a terrible past from which he is eager to flee.
  • C. Overly Wide Right Margin: If you stop yourself short of the right margin, it means you are putting up imaginary barriers as to how you can get in life. When you are moving to the right, you’re moving towards your goals and the future. When you stop too soon at the end of your lines, somewhere in your subconscious is a little voice saying, “Uh-oh. I have to stop. I have to return to the left, to the past and the familiar. This is as far as I can go.” You’re putting up a stop sign. (I’ve seen a few foreign exchange students with margins like these - missing their family overseas.)
  • D. Margins Too Wide All Around: Writing with margins that are too wide all around is abnormal. It looks more like a column or a poem. If you ask someone to give you a page of his ordinary writing, the person should not put the writing smack dab in the middle. This sort of person needs to be protected by four solid walls. He cannot make it on his own. He doesn’t relate to his environment in a normal manner or fit into society in an average way. 
  • E. Left Margin Widening as It Descends: This is rapid and spontaneous writing. If you’re writing quickly and spontaneously, you will leave wider and wider left margins as you descend (down) the page. In your haste to make a point and/or reach a goal, it becomes increasingly difficult to take the time to move all the way to the left side of the paper as you come to the next lines. 
  • F. Left Margin Narrowing as It Descends: This is a tendency to start out brave, going towards the future, but eventually retreating to the past and what is familiar. As this writer proceeds, he becomes more fearful and apprehensive about the future (as the left represents the past).
  • G. Narrow Margins on Left & Right Side: Some people write all the way to the side on both the left and right, leaving no side margin whatsoever. This trait indicates one who leaves no room for other people. Such a person doesn’t see things from other people’s point of view. Many times in the workplace there’s an employee who’s always having trouble with the other employees. That person often has this type of margin. He takes up all the space and doesn’t see himself properly in relation to his environment, leaving no room for the rights and opinions of others. 
  • H. Uneven Left Margin: If you’re like 99.999 percent of all literate people who write from left to right, you will automatically have made a straight left margin when writing to someone. It is the only graphological trait we all do in common. The left margin represents “the line of society." Thus, each time we return to the left, it’s up to us whether we’re going to align the next word, or we’re going to get "out of line." That small percentage who do not have a straight left margin are those people who cannot conform to society’s standards. These are also people who, quite expectedly, would not do well in a strict nine-to-five job; they cannot discipline themselves. 
  • I. No Margins at All: By “no margins at all,” it means someone who writes this way page after page. Obviously, this trait does not apply if someone wrote this way because he/she only had one piece of paper - that is only a matter of practicality, such as for taking notes. With no margins, filling every inch of the paper, indicates someone who feels he must fill every waking moment of his life with an activity. It means compulsively busy, leaving no stone unturned. Very such people have miserly natures as well. This person also leaves no room for the rights or opinions of others.
  • J. Wide Upper Margin: Graphologists can tell how formal or how informal you feel toward the person you’re writing to by how low or high on the paper you begin the letter. The lower you start, the more you tend to have formal, respectful feelings toward the person to whom you’re writing, such as a letters/papers to teachers, businesses…etc. You waste more paper to show respect, and you “lower” down on the paper. 
  • K. Narrow Upper Margin: In contrast, a narrow upper margin means you are feeling more familiar than formal toward the person to whom you are writing. By starting high on the paper, you don’t “bow down” or “lower yourself” to show respect.
  • L. Narrow Lower Margin: This is meant to represent writing until there was no room left - until the writing is crushed. This means someone who delays the inevitable. Such a person is so eager to express himself that he feels it would take too much time to turn the paper over or get another sheet. 
  • M. Crushed Right Margin: This is dangerous impulsiveness. People like this bash their heads into the wall and do it again and again - (They don’t learn from their mistakes.) They don’t have the sense to say it to themselves, “Hey, wait a minute. You know, the paper ends, and I have to accommodate.” They don’t say it because they don’t care or think about it. Right margin crashers are often people  who have accidents, perhaps driving off cliffs, someone who is accident prone, who doesn’t plan ahead.

Source: Andrea McNicole, Professor at the University of California

— 1 year ago with 3564 notes
#graphology  #handwriting analysis  #psychology  #writing  #english  #criminology  #sociology  #physiology 
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